Reports

First King
Posted on July 26, 2013 by

Offshore Kayak Fishing Trip Takes a Dangerous Turn

I just had one of the most epic adventures of my entire life. The day before Independence Day I set out for a four-day kayak fishing excursion to the Texas coast. I would end up pushing my limits to the max, having a brush with death, and catching some amazing fish in the process. This was an experience that I will remember for the rest of my life. Here is my story…

I loaded up the kayak and all of my fishing and camping gear and began the long journey from Dallas to Corpus Christi, TX. I arrived after dark and drove along the beach to my campsite. Straight off shore on the horizon I could see the blinking lights of my destination: the Mayan Princess oil rigs. I pitched my tent near the water and climbed in, thinking of nothing but the adventure that lied ahead.

When I awoke the conditions were ideal: the surf was flat, the wind was calm, and the water looked like glass beyond the breakers. I was amazed at the beauty of this place; it was not at all what I think of when I hear “Texas coast”. The sand was white, the water green and clear, and hardly any seaweed in sight. At around 7:00 AM the guys I was meeting began to arrive so we loaded up our kayaks and set off into the surf.

The three mile journey to the oil rigs could only be described as pleasant and serene. I saw a piece of trash floating in the water so I pedaled over to grab it and throw it in my kayak. My hand stopped inches above the bag when I realized it was not a bag but a huge Man o’ War. I looked up and realized they were everywhere. Needless to say, I elected not to go for a swim that day.

Man-o-War

I was trolling on the journey out, and as I approached the first rig, BOOM one of my reels starts screaming as the line peels off the reel. I grabbed the rod, tightened the drag, and held on for the ride. The water clarity this far out was simply incredible. A half hour into the fight, I looked down and could see a beautiful shade of yellow and gray over 20 feet below me.

Jack Crevalle Underwater

I had hooked into a gorgeous Jack Crevalle. This thing put up an incredible fight. I pulled it up into the boat and was grinning from ear to ear. I had landed my first deep-sea fish from the kayak, and it felt amazing.

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Year-round Piking
Posted on March 14, 2013 by

Year-round Piking by Richard MacRae

This report comes from Richard MacRae and was submitted as part of our 2012 Contributor Contest.


I know this is kind of a double entry in one, but the point of the entry is that I caught 67 Pike this year, starting in January and ending this December. To me, Pike are one of the most underrated species to catch. The challenge with Pike fishing is figuring out where they are hanging out (deep/shallow or bays/points etc.), how they want the presentation and where they want it. It’s not exactly true that they’ll hit anything, but they will hit everything, it just depends on their daily preference.

Year-round Piking

I like Piking, because you can fish them at anytime of the year, except of course when the season is closed during April and the first week in May. The two Pike in the pics show that – the January Pike was caught on the Mepps in shallow water and the December one was caught in deep water using a new method that I discovered this year; casting a 2 oz a bottom bouncer with a small silver rubber minnow. They were both 33″ long and at that size, they put up a great fight.

tristan-big-bass
Posted on March 12, 2013 by

The Big One by Tristan MacRae

This report comes from Tristan MacRae and was submitted as part of our 2012 Contributor Contest.


I was in Orlando, Florida during March break this year. My Dad and I both like fishing, so we went out with a guide called Capt. AJ Jackson to Lake Tohopekaliga. I was getting really bored because my Dad was catching all the fish and so I got annoyed and when the next fish hit I swiped the rod and then I was in. I was pretty scared, because the fish looked huge when it jumped and so I was worried I might get pulled into the water. I was fighting the fish for a few minutes and finally I got it in. Capt. Jackson pulled the fish on board the boat and then it was paparazzi time. I was amazed at how massive this fish was. I’ve caught Bass before, but nothing like this. Capt. Jackson told me that this was a once-in-a-lifetime fish – ten pounds, he said. He even put a picture on his website. My picture shows up after a few other people’s. We released the fish after the pictures were taken.

The Big One by Tristan MacRae

Fall Musky Fishing on the Johnny by Marlon Prince
Posted on March 12, 2013 by

Fall Musky Fishing on the Johnny by Marlon Prince

This report comes from Marlon Prince and was submitted as part of our 2012 Contributor Contest.


As I know you guys are aware musky can give you a beat down, and I was getting banged up pretty good this year. Most of the season I was attempting the impossible, landing a musky on the fly. With countless follows, eats, a few hookups but no fish landed, I was beginning to think my boat had some kind of anti-musky stank on it. Most of the time I’m fishing with friends throwing gear and still no musky in the boat. I drove from Halfax, NS to Fredericton, NB almost every weekend to fish for the big musky. After the time and gas money spent, logging well over a couple hundred hours this season I started to wonder “Why am I doing this?”

Fall Musky Fishing on the Johnny by Marlon Prince

Fast forward to Oct 13, 2012 in Meductic, NB. I booked an extra long weekend off work in hopes the cool fall weather would turn the fish on and maybe I’d be at the right place at the right time. My girlfriend and I fished two days with no sign of fish. Saturday morning we took our time and made a big breakfast around the fire before hitting the water. I knew it was going to be a good day when my girlfriend landed her biggest smallie to date on her second or third cast. We fished the morning and landed some good size smallmouth bass up untill around noon when the water started getting rough. The Saint John River was at her meanest, throwing 2-4ft swells at us. No way I can throw a fly in this stuff! With no sign of musky and the waves crashing, I decided to switch my gear and troll. I threw on a 8″ hellhound “triple d” in walleye colour, which had been a proven musky producer for me the previous fall. I made the call to troll a shady shoreline with a steep 30′ drop off. My girlfriend was doubtful.

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